Your pregnancy week by week

Pregnancy goes on for nine months and there’s lots happening every week. If you’re curious to find out more about how your baby is growing read on …….

WEEK SIX: By now your baby will measure only about 8 to 10mm, (approximately the size of a lentil) and look similar to a tadpole, but their heartbeat may be detectable on an private early ultrasound scan. Early scans are sometimes performed transvaginally to confirm a pregnancy is still progressing, particularly if you have been experiencing bleeding or spotting. At this stage a scan will be able to distinguish a curved ‘fetal pole’ with a head at one end and a tail-like structure at the other end. The neural tube will have closed this week.
A bump forms where the head and brain will develop. The brain will divide into distinct areas, eyes and ears begin to form and the buds of arms and legs develop. They may still be tiny, but complicated structures are rapidly forming including the tongue, and their lip and palate, as well as nerves to later detect smell.

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Your pregnancy week by week

Pregnancy goes on for nine months and there’s lots happening every week. If you’re curious to find out more about how your baby is growing read on …….

WEEK FIVE: This is usually the time you find out you’re pregnant when you miss a period and use a pregnancy urine test. It’s also a crucial point in your baby’s development, as it’s when the neural tube begins to form.[i] This later develops into the brain and spinal cord. Taking a daily 400mcg folic acid before you conceive and in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy can reduce your chances of your baby developing a neural tube defect such as spina bifida by as much as 70 per cent.[ii] By now the placenta has begun to form, as well as the buds of their arms and legs.

[i] http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/prenatal-care/art-20045302

[ii] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17487022

Your pregnancy week by week

Pregnancy goes on for nine months and there’s lots happening every week. If you’re curious to find out more about how your baby is growing read on …….

WEEK FOUR: By now the blastocyst will have implanted itself into the thickened lining of your uterus, this may cause a tiny amount of bleeding or spotting called implantation bleeding. It will be just the size of a poppy seed around 2mm in size, but will have already developed a yolk sac. An inner group of cells form the embryo, and the outer cells later link to your blood supply to form a special pregnancy organ called the placenta, providing the baby with food and oxygen for the rest of the pregnancy.

Your pregnancy week by week

Pregnancy goes on for nine months and there’s lots happening every week. If you’re curious to find out more about how your baby is growing read on …….

WEEK THREE: If a sperm fertilises your egg in your fallopian tubes a rapid process of cell division begins. The fertilised egg is known as a zygote with a single set of 46 chromosomes containing all the genetic material from the two parents to make a baby. At this stage it is just a disc of cells. It will travel down the fallopian tubes, cells dividing rapidly and then known as a blastocyst, a hollow cyst.

Your pregnancy week by week

Pregnancy goes on for nine months and there’s lots happening every week. If you’re curious to find out more about how your baby is growing read on …….

WEEK TWO: By the end of the second week of your menstrual cycle one of your ovaries will release an egg[i] – this is referred to as ovulation. The timing of this does vary though according to the length of your cycle, so it’s best not to get too hung up about timing sex to coincide with this moment. You then have a window of 12 to 24 hours for sperm to penetrate the egg. Sperm can live for several days though.

 

[i] http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/ency/articles/fetal-development

Your pregnancy week by week

Pregnancy goes on for nine months and there’s lots happening every week. If you’re curious to find out more about how your baby is growing read on …….

WEEK ONE: It sounds bonkers to date your pregnancy from before you’ve even conceived, but because it’s difficult to pinpoint the exact time of conception, doctors and midwives do precisely this. Your pregnancy is therefore dated from the first day of your last period. This is referred to as gestational age.